The Legislative Session Began Monday!

The 2020 legislative session began Monday, March 9th. It kicked off with the Governor’s annual State of the State address on Monday afternoon and continued with a flurry of introductory committee meetings.

Learn more about LFT's five main legislative priorities this session: 

1. Reduce Unnecessary Testing
2. Secure Pay Raises and Increased School Funding
3. Protect Retirement
4. Improve School Safety & Discipline
5. Expand and Protect the Rights of Working People

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BESE Approves MFP & More

In March, BESE met to approve an MFP proposal with $80 million dollars in additional funding. They also examined the Jump Start program, talked about the process to hire John White's replacement and more. 

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Public Schools Week 2020

 

 

 

This Lundi Gras we kick off National Public Schools Week!

Join LFT, AFT and the whole Learning First Alliance to celebrate and honor our nation’s public schools.

Nine out of 10 students in the United States attend public schools, so let’s call attention to the great work being done to give our nation’s children every opportunity to grow and succeed.

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The January Newsletter

 

After last year’s contentious elections, January brought our new and old representatives together to begin their work on behalf of the Louisiana voters. Governor Edwards was sworn in at a ceremony on the steps of the Capitol on January 13th. On that same day the House and Senate convened an organizational session.

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The December Newsletter

Thank you for being a member of the Louisiana Federation of Teachers and School Employees.

This year has gone by so fast, but through our collective power we’ve accomplished a lot. From raises, to new friends and election victories, 2019 has been a year to remember.

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EdWeek blogger: NAEP must get standards right

Here’s a damning report from Education Week blogger Marc Tucker that rings true in Louisiana as well as many other states: “From the beginning, the leaders of our state education systems have invited testing experts to help them set the cut points for passing or not passing the state tests.  They listen gravely to the advice of the experts, then ask them how many students will fail at the recommended cut point and set a new one at a point that is politically tolerable.”

Tucker writes as the Nation’s Report Card’s governing board sets out to write new proficiency standards. He is president of the National Center on Education and the Economy, and he believes that current NAEP standards do not align to real-world college and career readiness. That, he says, must change.

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